Monthly Archives: June 2016

The advantage that you use medical mafia

What if someone invented an electronic device that would destroy pathogens, bacteria, and even viruses with no toxic side effects? What if that same device could wipe out cancer by altering the cancer’s cellular environment or by killing cancer viruses with an electronic or ultra sonic beam? That was accomplished years ago. The researcher who invented and perfected this device had an odd name, Royal Raymond Rife. But his associates and colleagues knew him as Roy Rife.

The original Rife machine, based on a naval radio frequency oscillator, evolved to the Rife Ray Tube. It is the basis of Rife technology that underwent successful trials and experiments as it was developed in the 1930’s. You’d think that further research into Rife’s findings would have been supported and propagated further for the welfare of all. And at first it was. But guess what, Rife’s technology was suppressed by the medical mafia, and very little has come of it. Nothing new here.

How It Works (Basically)

Have you ever seen or heard of singers who could shatter wine glasses by hitting and sustaining the right note? How about striking a tuning fork held next to another of the same pitch that is not struck, but vibrates and makes a tone anyway? These are visible examples of vibrational reciprocity in the sonic range. From this basic understanding, Rife developed what he called resonance therapy.

Imagine if minuscule pathogens had energy frequencies beyond the sonic range that, if induced, would cause the pathogen to implode or explode. This Rife called the Mortal Oscillatory Resonance or MOR. It is technology within the arena of energetic healing, but more in the western mode of challenging pathogens with technological machinery from outside. With a special microscope of his own making, Rife was able to observe and record the MOR of many pathogens.

Instead of dealing with the vibrational field of the patient, or the patient’s chi energy, Rife used high frequency energies created by electronic machinery to alter both pathogens and their environments. The difference between Rife’s Ray Beam and common radiation therapy was that only those specific MOR frequencies of targeted microorganisms had negative responses. All other cells were left unharmed. This is the essence of Rife’s technology.

Also included in his research was observing morphing pathogenic bacteria and viruses into different less destructive forms. He was among a growing number of microbiologists and researchers who had adopted Pleomorphism as an explanation of microorganism life. Pleomorphism posits that the life form of a pathogenic microbe alters, possibly many times.

Rife also noticed corresponding changes in the tissue or blood environment of these morphing microorganisms. This led to the theory that the condition of the germs’ medium, i.e. the blood or tissue, was the cause of disease and not the germ. Rife did observe the pH changes in what is now called the field or terrain in the microorganism’s host environment as well as its association with bacterial/viral morphing.

He considered that the field pH changes influenced the microorganisms morphing, causing them to become more pathogenic or more benign depending on the pH factor. This was the precursor to the field or terrain theory as a source of disease that many holistic healers now embrace over the germ theory. Rife was beginning to realize this in spite of being able to kill the germs of many diseases with his ray tube.

Monomorphismwas the accepted theory at that time since microscopy was not able to observe the mutable morphing of microorganisms. This re-enforced the old germ theory and made a lot of people in western medicine happy to be in their profession. What was usually observed with the microscopes of that time were simply shells of dead viruses and bacteria.

Because the electronics of electronic microscopes killed the tiny microbes, electronic microscopes were unable to observe pleomorphic alterations or the result of the correct resonance (MOR) applied for its destruction while alive. As is the nature for accepted doctrine, especially when there are significant monetary interests, monomorphism was in and pleomorphism was out!

This despite the fact that to pleomorphism advocates’ glee, Rife’s Universal Microscope made observing microbes changing form a reality. Photos and films were provided to scientists who were open to this, and eventually a couple of prominent scientists gained access to Rife’s Universal Microscope to observe the previously unseen phenomena first hand.

Victory of Food Technology

Should you be consuming canola oil? The FDA seems to think so, allowing canola labels to claim it supports heart health and reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. Even Whole Foods Markets is on board with canola oil, and most foods on their hot bar are swimming in it. Proponents point out that canola is inexpensive, tastes good, and has the lowest saturated fat content of any common edible oil. Some health experts suggest a daily consumption of 1 1/2 tablespoons of canola oil. But evidence is mounting that canola oil actually promotes heart disease and is a hoax on the public rivaling the promotion of margarine. Leading experts on oils and fats see canola oil as a victory for a food processing industry that will not be happy until all traditional, real foods have been replaced by imitation foods.

Canola oil is a product of food technology

Peanut oil comes from peanuts, and soybean oil comes from soybeans, but there is no such thing a canola. Canola is a marketing name derived from Canadian-oil. Canola oil comes from the rapeseed plant (Brassica napus), and belongs to the mustard family whose famous members include turnips and broccoli. As we know it today, canola oil is the result of the hybridization and genetic modification of the rapeseed plant to breed out its undesirable taste and its hazards to health.

Oil from the rapeseed plant as nature created it has been used in China, Japan and India for thousands of years as the poor man’s cooking oil. The oil contained a long-chain fatty acid called erucic acid which was irritating to mucous membranes, and glucosinolates which taste so bitter that animals will not eat feed containing it. Consumption of the original rapeseed oil was associated with high incidence of fibrotic heart lesions, known as Keshan’s disease, as well as disorders of the central nervous system, lung and prostate cancer, anemia, and constipation. These were the characteristics that Canadian geneticists diligently tried to get rid of in their efforts to morph rapeseed oil into canola oil. Some health professionals believe there is still too much erucic acid present in the oil for safe use.

The food technology industry has a long history of manipulating consumers

The food technology business operates on the Hegelian Principle. First a problem is created and blown out of proportion, and then a solution is offered. When food technologists got going right after World War II, one of their first efforts was to turn people against butter so they could be sold a concoction known as margarine. Eventually people woke up to the ill effects of margarine, and the food industry promoted their latest creation, polyunsaturated oils, as the new “healthy” alternative. But it quickly became clear that polyunsaturated oils, especially corn and soybean oils, caused numerous health problems.

Since the food industry had so effectively turned everyone against saturated fats, their only solution was to embrace the use of monounsaturated oils, with olive oil becoming the new darling. It was an easy switch, because the benefits of olive oil were documented in research and were associated with the health and longevity of people who ate the Mediterranean diet. The problem was that olive oil simply pressed from olives required no technological intervention, and olive oil was too expensive to be used in processed foods. The result was the birth of canola oil, newly named for the country where the majority of rapeseed plants are grown.

The name was not the only thing new. Genetic modification has made the already hybridized new rapeseed into a plant tolerant of the herbicide Roundup. This modification reduces the amount of chemical needed for weed control in the fields where the hybridized plants are grown making rapeseed a cheap crop to produce. Because all proteins are removed from oil during processing, canola oil made from genetically modified rapeseed plants is claimed by its promoters to be the same as canola oil produced from conventionally grown rapeseed plants; however, some countries have banned the sale of oil made from genetically modified seeds.

How the technology can improve your memory

You have everything you need to keep you informed. Technology provides you with answers to almost any question instantly. If you need reminders, you can program devices to prompt you to remember your appointments and to-do list. Yet, you keep forgetting things. Right now you may not be sure where you put your BlackBerry charger or whether you took your vitamins that morning. You also may not be sure if it’s your turn to pick up the kids today.

While technology saves us the burden of remembering endless details, it also adds to our memory problems. In part, that’s because we need to remember random codes like passwords, logins and user names. These strings of numbers and letters become useful as codes precisely because they are confusing and meaningless. But that’s also what makes them hard for our brains to access.

Memory works best when it interconnects. We create neural pathways in our brains as we connect a new piece of information with sensory details, recollections and knowledge — forming a meaningful memory that we can easily retrieve. For example, you may be standing outside and notice a bird you haven’t seen before. Someone tells you the tiny songbird is a barn swallow known as a traveler. It flies hundreds of miles a day in search of food, and each year migrates up to 14,000 miles. You may feel a sudden kinship with this energetic creature since your life keeps you constantly busy as well. When and where you hear facts, how you feel at the time, and the way you link the details with other information in your mind — this all plays a part in memory. Chances are you will remember the sunny warmth of the day when you first saw the barn swallow and the insight gained as you thought about your own life ‘on the fly.’

Another problem with technology is the obvious way that it interrupts us. Details are locked into our memories when we pay careful attention to them. That makes them more easily retrieved as well. How often do you have a full half hour, let alone a full five minutes to concentrate on any one thing without email, text messages or other distractions? Yet without concentration, recall is challenged. A meal is much more memorable at a new elegant restaurant because of the attention paid to it and the time devoted to it. You are fully aware of the novelty as you savor each mouthful, and thus remember the experience. Contrast that with a meal eaten at your desk while finishing a project. The food you ingest is hardly tasted let alone memorable. A few weeks later you can recall one meal while the other has been completely forgotten. It isn’t the food eaten quite so much as the attention you paid to it that made the difference.

We also have to admit that technology removes some of the mental discipline that every generation before us had to practice. We may be weakening ourselves over time because we don’t have to do the work of memorizing information, navigating roads or keeping track of upcoming events now that digital devices handle those tasks for us. What evidence do we have? Technology not only affects the way we process information, taken to an extreme it may also diminish memory. In the book, “Carved in Sand: When Attention Fails and Memory Fades in Midlife,” author Cathryn Jakobson Ramin says that there’s a name in Japan for those who constantly click away at keypads. They’re called “oyayubizoku,” or “thumb tribe.” Researchers at Japan’s Hokkaido University School of Medicine studied a group of oyayubizoku whose lives are consumed by electronic organizers, cell phones and laptops. They found that about ten percent of them had lessened the brain’s capacity to learn and store information. One neurobiologist commented that these individuals had “lost the ability to remember new things, to pull out old data or to distinguish between important and unimportant information.”

Of course, when you are concerned about your memory you’re often told that the remedy is more technology. To some extent that may be helpful if you use reminder and calendar functions. As baby boomers approach the geriatric decades, the market is filling with technology promoted to enhance memory. Video “brain games” are said to guarantee results in a few minutes a day. There’s not much solid research to back up these claims. Some of these products are engaging and could do a passable job of stimulating thinking, especially if used more than a minute or two. But building mental fitness requires the same kind of practice and dedication as physical fitness. Long-term use of such games may be useful, yet there are many other ways to improve your memory without spending time and money on mental gymnastics.

Attitude

It’s common to notice an occasional lapse in memory, after all, forgetfulness isn’t something you appreciate. You may even begin to humorously identify yourself as someone with a failing memory. But when you highlight these very normal mistakes, you aren’t helping the problem. That’s due to what psychologists call “self-talk,” the ongoing internal conversation we have with ourselves. If your self-talk includes the idea that you have a “brain like a sieve” or “error—memory leak” is your mode of operation, you will notice more and more evidence that supports this negative concept. Unintentionally you are reinforcing traits like inattention and confusion. Instead, cultivate an attitude of appreciation for your mind and body. Notice the amount of high-level thinking that you do. Adopt a healthier mindset by regarding memory lapses as incidents which are warning that it’s time to slow down and start savoring your life more.

Meditation

Studies indicate that people who meditate have an improved outlook and increased concentration. They also have somewhat better memories. Research at Massachusetts General Hospital shows that regular meditation increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, thickening that area of the brain. It’s thought that this physical change enhances focus, memory and attention span. Meditation allows you to access the stillness beyond your thinking mind, to enter a state of peaceful awareness that simply observes. There are many forms of meditation. Develop a practice that fits into your life and enjoy benefits that go well beyond improved memory.

Know that used on air passengers may damage human DNA

In researching the biological effects of the millimeter wave scanners used for whole body imaging at airports, NaturalNews has learned that the energy emitted by the machines may damage human DNA.

Millimeter wave machines represent one of two primary technologies currently being used for the “digital strip searches” being conducted at airports around the world. “The Transportation Security Administration utilizes two technologies to capture naked images of air travelers – backscatter x-ray technology and millimeter wave technology,” reports the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a non-profit currently suing the U.S. government to stop these electronic strip searches.

In order to generate the nude image of the human body, these machines emit terahertz photons — high-frequency energy “particles” that can pass through clothing and body tissue.

The manufacturers of such machines claim they are perfectly safe and present no health risks, but a study conducted by Boian S. Alexandrov (and colleagues) at the Center for Nonlinear Studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico showed that these terahertz waves could “…unzip double-stranded DNA, creating bubbles in the double strand that could significantly interfere with processes such as gene expression and DNA replication.”

In layman’s terms, any time you’re talking about interfering with “gene expression” and “DNA replication,” you’re essentially talking about something that could be a risk to human health.

Never approved as safe for humans

“At first glance, it’s easy to dismiss any notion that they can be damaging,” reports TechnologyReview.com (http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/arxiv/2…). “But a new generation of cameras are set to appear that not only record terahertz waves but also bombard us with them. And if our exposure is set to increase, the question that urgently needs answering is what level of terahertz exposure is safe.”

And yet no such long-term safety testing has ever been conducted by a third party. There have been no clinical trials indicating that multiple exposures to such terahertz waves, accumulated over a long period of time, are safe for humans. The FDA, in particular, has never granted its approval for any such devices even though these devices clearly qualify as “medical devices.”

(If you try to sell an X-ray imaging device yourself, without FDA approval, you’ll be arrested. So why do these TSA suppliers get away with selling human body imaging equipment that has never been adequately safety tested or approved by the FDA?)

The study cited in the TechnologyReview article mentioned above is visible at: http://arxiv.org/abs/0910.5294

There, study authors conclude: “Based on our results we argue that a specific terahertz radiation exposure may significantly affect the natural dynamics of DNA, and thereby influence intricate molecular processes involved in gene expression and DNA replication.”

In other words, millimeter wave scanning devices may damage your DNA.

Could these scans cause cancer and birth defects?

Could these scans cause infertility? Cancer? Shortened lifespan? We don’t yet know the answers to these questions, but then again neither does the TSA. This technology is being recklessly rolled out without adequate safety testing that would prove it safe for long-term use.

How many times in the past have the “experts” told us technologies were perfectly safe and then later we found out they were dangerous? X-Rays were once used in shoe stores to see if new shoes would fit the bone structure of your feet. High-voltage power lines are perfectly safe, we’re told — but then why do children who live closer to those lines have higher rates of cancer?

Dentists still claim that mercury fillings are perfectly safe for your health — a preposterous notion — and cell phone companies continue to insist that cell phone radiation isn’t hazardous to your health at all. Time and time again, the public has been lied to by the authorities during the roll-out of some new technology. Why should we believe that full-body scanners are safe when they’ve never been proven safe? Furthermore, there is now reason to believe they may damage human DNA.

What if the experts are wrong about their safety and ten years later we find out that there is cumulative DNA damage that causes infertility and cancer? What if air travelers who subject themselves to this radiation wind up suffering some currently-unknown health condition as a result? At no time in the history of human civilization have large numbers of humans ever been subjected to terahertz bombardment of this type and frequency.

Sure, you can argue that you get more radiation sitting in an airplane at high altitude than you get from a full-body scanner, or you can explain that cell phones emit far more radiation on the whole (which they do, when you’re talking on them anyway). But if there’s one thing we all should have learned about radiation by now it’s that frequencies matter. The terahertz frequencies have never been rolled out en masse in a scanning technology. Who’s to say they’re going to be safe?

What about pregnant women? Can the TSA absolutely guarantee that these full-body scanners won’t damage the DNA of the unborn babies? What if this technology becomes the next Thalidomide and ten months from now women start giving birth to mutant babies who were damaged by terahertz radiation?

I’m not saying this is going to happen, but wouldn’t it be wise to determine the safety of this technology in advance of its global rollout?

As the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements admitted in a 2002 report that studied these security devices:

“[We] cannot exclude the possibility of a fatal cancer attributable to radiation in a very large population of people exposed to very low doses of radiation.”

Barring solid evidence of the safety of this terahertz-emitting technology, the TSA would be wise to follow the Precautionary Principle which states that we should err on the side of caution when it comes to the roll out of new technologies. Unfortunately, the TSA appears to be erring on the side of stupidity by subjecting the public to an unproven, “experimental” technology with unknown long-term effects on human DNA.

And here’s the real kicker: These full-body scanners do nothing to stop terrorists because they can’t detect powder explosives in the first place. A determined terrorist can hide all sorts of powder in a shoe, or a sleeping pillow, or a plastic bag sewn into the side of his carry-on luggage. There are a thousand places for terrorists to hide explosives that won’t be caught on full-body scanners, no matter how detailed the images are.

Besides, in order to avoid engaging in child pornography (because these machines offer very detailed depictions of body parts), the rules will allow people under 18 years of age to bypass them. So all you need then, if you’re a terrorist, is a 17-year-old terrorist assistant who can pack explosives in his own underwear.